Bra Size Calculator

Bra Size Calculator

Bra Size Calculator

Your Bra Size:

How can I calculate my bra size?

To calculate your bra size, measure your underbust and fullest bust using a soft measuring tape. Subtract the underbust measurement from the fullest bust measurement to determine your cup size. The difference in inches corresponds to the cup size letter (e.g., 1 inch difference is an A cup). Your band size is determined by your underbust measurement. Combine the band size and cup size to determine your bra size.


To calculate your bra size, you'll need two measurements: the underbust measurement (the circumference of your ribcage just beneath your breasts) and the fullest bust measurement (the circumference of your breasts at the fullest point). Follow these steps to calculate your bra size:

  1. Underbust Measurement: Take a soft measuring tape and wrap it around your ribcage, just beneath your breasts. Ensure the tape is snug and level all the way around. Note down the measurement in inches or centimeters.
  2. Fullest Bust Measurement: Position the measuring tape around the fullest part of your breasts, typically across the nipple line. Make sure the tape is straight and not too tight or loose. Record the measurement in inches or centimeters.
  3. Calculate Band Size: Subtract your underbust measurement from your fullest bust measurement. The difference between these two measurements will help determine your band size. Use the following guide:
    • If the difference is less than 1 inch (2.5 cm), your band size is the same as your underbust measurement.
    • If the difference is between 1-2 inches (2.5-5 cm), round to the nearest even number to determine your band size.
    • If the difference is greater than 2 inches (5 cm), round to the nearest even number and add 2 to determine your band size.
  4. Calculate Cup Size: The cup size is determined by the difference between your fullest bust measurement and your band size. Use the following guide:
    • A difference of 1 inch (2.5 cm) corresponds to an A cup.
    • Each subsequent inch (2.5 cm) difference corresponds to the next cup size alphabetically (B, C, D, etc.).
  5. Determine Your Bra Size: Combine your band size (step 3) with your cup size (step 4) to determine your bra size. For example, if your band size is 34 inches and your cup size is B, your bra size would be 34B.

Remember that this is a general method, and individual preferences and body shapes can vary. It's always helpful to try on bras in different styles and sizes to find the most comfortable and supportive fit for you.

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Why do you add 4 inches to your band size?

The practice of adding 4 inches (or sometimes 5 inches) to the underbust measurement to determine the band size is an outdated method that is no longer commonly used. In modern bra sizing, it is generally recommended to use your actual underbust measurement without adding any extra inches.

Using the exact underbust measurement provides a more accurate and precise fit, as it ensures that the band of the bra provides adequate support and stays in place. The band size is typically measured in even numbers (e.g., 32, 34, 36), and if you get an odd number, it's generally recommended to round up to the next even number.

The cup size is determined by the difference between the underbust and fullest bust measurements, without adding any additional inches. This allows for a better fitting cup that accommodates the actual size of your breasts.

It's important to note that bra sizing can vary between brands and styles, so it's always advisable to try on bras and consult each brand's specific size charts for the most accurate fit.

How do I know my cup size without measuring?


Determining your cup size without measuring can be challenging, as accurate measurements are typically needed for an optimal fit. However, there are a few indicators you can look for to get a general idea of your cup size:

  1. Bust Appearance: Observe the appearance of your breasts in relation to your body. If your breasts appear small and don't project much, you may have a smaller cup size. If they appear larger and have more projection, you may have a larger cup size.
  2. Bra Fit: Assess how your current bras fit you. If you find that the cups are too small and your breasts spill out or create bulges, it suggests you may need a larger cup size. Conversely, if the cups are too large and there is empty space or wrinkling, it may indicate a smaller cup size.
  3. Bra Sister Sizing: Sister sizing refers to finding a bra with a different band size but maintaining the same cup volume. For example, if you're currently wearing a 34C bra, you can try a 32D or a 36B to see if the cup size is more suitable.

However, it's important to note that these indicators are general guidelines and may not provide an accurate measurement. For the best fit and comfort, it's recommended to measure your underbust and fullest bust using a measuring tape and refer to a bra size calculator or size chart provided by reputable lingerie brands.

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How big is a cup D breast?


Cup size alone does not provide a precise measurement of breast size, as it is relative to the band size of the bra. Cup size represents the difference between the underbust measurement and the fullest bust measurement.

That being said, a cup D breast size typically indicates a larger breast size relative to the band size. However, without the corresponding band size, it is challenging to determine the exact dimensions or volume of a cup D breast. For instance, a 32D would have a different cup volume compared to a 36D.

Bra sizing is a combination of both band size and cup size, and it's important to consider both measurements together to achieve the best fit. It is recommended to measure the underbust and fullest bust using a measuring tape and consult a bra size calculator or size chart provided by reputable lingerie brands for accurate and personalized bra sizing.

Is a DDD the same as an F?


Yes, in most sizing systems, DDD (or triple D) is equivalent to F. Bra sizing can vary slightly between different brands and countries, leading to some variation in naming conventions. However, in the commonly used US sizing system and many other systems, the cup progression typically goes as follows:

A - B - C - D - DD (or E) - DDD (or F) - G - H - and so on.

So, DDD (or F) would be the next cup size after DD (or E). It's worth noting that some brands may use different naming conventions, so it's always a good idea to consult the specific brand's size chart for accurate sizing information.

Is it better to go up a cup size or band size?


Determining whether it's better to go up a cup size or band size depends on the specific fit issues you are experiencing with your bra. Here are some guidelines to consider:

  1. Band Size: If your band feels too tight and uncomfortable, it may be beneficial to go up a band size. However, keep in mind that a properly fitting band should feel snug and provide the majority of the support. Going up a band size may result in a looser band, which may reduce support and cause the bra to ride up.
  2. Cup Size: If you notice spillage, bulging, or inadequate coverage in the cups, it may indicate that the cup size is too small. In such cases, going up a cup size can help provide better coverage and a more comfortable fit.
  3. Band and Cup Combination: Sometimes, you may need to adjust both the band and cup sizes to achieve the best fit. For example, if you increase the band size, you may need to decrease the cup size to maintain the same cup volume, or vice versa.
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It's important to remember that bra sizing is not one-size-fits-all, and individual body shapes and preferences can vary. It's advisable to try on bras in different sizes and styles to find the best fit for your unique needs. Consulting a professional bra fitter or referring to a brand's size chart can also be helpful in finding the right balance between band and cup sizes.

How many pounds do you have to be to go down a band size?


The number of pounds needed to go down a band size can vary depending on individual factors such as body composition, body shape, and the specific brand's sizing. However, as a general guideline, approximately 5-10 pounds of weight loss or gain can lead to a change in band size.

Weight loss or gain affects different individuals differently. Some people may notice a change in their band size with a smaller weight loss, while others may require a more significant weight change. It's important to remember that everyone's body is unique, and the distribution of weight loss or gain may vary.

Additionally, factors such as muscle tone, body composition, and personal preference for a tighter or looser fit can influence the impact of weight changes on band size.

It's always recommended to try on bras and assess the fit to determine if a change in band size is necessary, rather than solely relying on a specific weight threshold. Consulting with a professional bra fitter or referring to a brand's size chart can also provide valuable guidance in finding the right band size for your changing body.

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